Ecet 350 devry final-timed | Computer Science homework help

ECET350 Final Exam Study Guide

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1. The Final Exam is open book and open notes. The maximum time that you can spend in the exam is 3 hours, 30 minutes. If you have not clicked the Submit For Grading button by then, you will be exited from the exam automatically. In the Final Exam environment, the Windows clipboard is disabled, so you will not be able to copy exam questions or answers to or from other applications.

2. You should click the Save Answers button in the exam frequently. This helps prevent connection timeouts that might occur with certain Internet service providers, and also minimizes lost answers in the event of connection problems. If your Internet connection does break, when you reconnect, you will normally be able to get back into your Final Exam without any trouble. Remember, though, that the exam timer continues to run while students are disconnected, so students should try to log in again as quickly as possible. The Help Desk cannot grant any student additional time on the exam.

3. See the Syllabus section “Due Dates for Assignments & Exams” for due date information.

4. Reminders

  • You will only be able to enter your online Final Exam one time.
  • Click the Save Answers button often.
  • If you lose your Internet connection during your Final Exam, log on again and try to access it. If you are unable to enter the Final Exam, first contact the Help Desk and then your instructor.
  • You will always be able to see the time remaining on the Final Exam at the top right of the page.

5. Assessments with Multiple Pages

  • Make sure to click the Save Answers button before advancing to the next page (we also suggest clicking on Save Answers while you are working).
  • Complete all of the pages before submitting your Final Exam for instructor review.
  • Do NOT use your browser’s Back and Forward buttons during the Final Exam.
  • Please use the provided links for navigation.

6. Submitting Your Final Exam

  • When you are finished with the Final Exam, click on the Submit For Grading button.
  • Please note: Once you click the Submit For Grading button, you will NOT be able to edit or change any of your answers.

7. Exam Questions

  • There are 14 randomly selected multiple-choice questions, each worth 5 points, for a total of 70 points.
  • There are five randomly selected short-answer questions, each worth 10 points, for a total of 50 points.
  • There are six randomly selected essay questions, each worth 20 points, for a total of 120 points.
  • The Final Exam covers all course TCOs and Weeks 1–7.
  • The Final Exam consists of two pages, which can be completed in any order. You may go back and forth between the pages.

·       The Final Exam questions are pooled. This means that not everyone will have the same questions. Even if you do have some of the same questions, they may not be in the same order. These questions are distributed among the TCOs. The entire exam is worth 240 points.

·       On the short answer questions, your answers should be succinct, fully address each part of the question, and should demonstrate your knowledge and understanding in a concise but complete manner. Short answer questions require answers that range from a couple of sentences to a couple of paragraphs that directly speak to each part of the question. 

·       Essay questions require answers that range from either a couple of paragraphs or to equations and solutions that directly speak to each part of the question. Answers to essay questions that require equations and solutions must show those equations and solutions in addition to a final correct answer to receive full credit.

·       Some students opt to work on the short answer and essay questions first, due to their higher point value and the length of time needed to adequately address each question, but this is entirely your choice.

·       Remember to always use proper citation when quoting other sources. This means that ANY borrowed material (even a short phrase) should be placed in quotation marks with the source (URL, author/date/page number) immediately following the end of the passage (the end quote). Changing a few words in a passage does NOT constitute putting it in your own words, and proper citation is still required. Borrowed material should NOT dominate a student’s work; it should only be used sparingly to support the student’s thoughts, ideas, and examples. Heavy usage of borrowed material (even if properly cited) can jeopardize the points for that question. Uncited material can jeopardize a passing grade on the exam. As a part of our commitment to academic integrity, your work may be submitted to turnitin.com, an online plagiarism-checking service. Please be very mindful of proper citation. 

8.  Some of the key study areas are shown below. Although these are key areas, remember that the exam is comprehensive for all of the assigned course content, and this study guide may not be all-inclusive.

o   Understand the circuit topologies of noninverting configurations, such as the Sallen-Key filter, and the inverting configuration, such as the multiple feedback filter.

o   Be able to match the circuit transfer function G(s) to the filter transfer function H(s) that results in a set of design equations for filter circuit realization.

o   Be able to design an appropriate active filter circuit using the operational amplifiers, and determine the values for RC circuit elements; illustrate frequency and impedance scaling.

 

  • TCO 2
    • Be able to sketch the Fourier transform of an ideal-impulse sampling process to graphically illustrate the sampled signal spectrum is the sum of the scaled original spectrum and its replicas centered at the multiples of the sampling frequency.
    • Understand how to calculate and observe the effects of quantization on a sampled, analog signal as affected by the number of bits used in the sampling.
    • Be able to use design tool software, such as Matlab, to determine the order of antialiasing, low-pass filter to satisfy the Nyquist requirement for reducing aliasing noise level.
    • Be able to use design tool software, such as Matlab, to determine the order of the anti-image filter (reconstruction filter or smooth filter) to satisfy the requirement for reducing the image distortion level to reconstruct the analog signal when supplied with the DAC output of a sample and hold voltage levels and the sampling rate.

TCO 3

o   Be familiar with linear, time-invariant, causal systems.

o   Be able to analyze the structure and characteristics of nonrecursive and recursive difference equations.

    • Be familiar with impulse and step response characteristics of digital filters.
    • Investigate the basics of convolution as applied to difference equations.
    • Mathematically investigate and document the characteristics of various length moving average filters and their response.

 

o   Understand the basic characteristics of finite impulse response filters, including frequency response and linear phase response.

o   Know how to use the impulse response to examine the characteristics of the approximation of an ideal low-pass filter, including the effects of artificially truncating the impulse response.

o   Understand the most commonly used window functions, such as rectangular, Hanning, Hamming and Blackman, and examine the frequency domain characteristics of each.

o   Use the windowed and truncated impulse response design methodology to be able to design, implement, and test a low-pass, finite impulse response digital filters, investigating the performance tradeoffs of filter performance versus coefficient length and frequency transition width.

 

o   Be able to use the windowed and truncated impulse response design methodology to design, implement, and test a band pass, high-pass, and band stop finite impulse response digital filter, investigating the performance tradeoffs of filter performance versus coefficient length and frequency transition width.

o   Understand how to use filter design software, such as Matlab, design, implement, and test a band pass, high-pass, or band stop finite impulse response digital filter, and investigate the performance tradeoffs of filter performance versus coefficient length and frequency transition width.

o   Analyze the effects of filter coefficient bit length and quantization on filter response.

 

o   Understand the basic characteristics of infinite impulse response (IIR) filters.

o   Know the characteristics of low-pass analog filters, such as frequency response and cutoff frequency.

o   Be able to design a low-pass IIR filter based on bilinear transformation.

o   Know how to design a low-pass IIR filter based on a Butterworth filter design using a bilinear transformation.

 

o   Understand the Chebyshev Type I Filter.

o   Be familiar with the concept of best fit IIR filter design and the use of filter design software, such as Matlab, in the design of complex IIR filters.

o   Understand the techniques of a design band pass, high-pass, and band stop IIR filter.

o   Understand the performance tradeoffs of IIR filters as compared to FIR filters, including phase response, coefficient quantization effects, real-time performance, and stability.

 

9.  Areas that were discussed in the Discussion areas will be prime targets.

10. Assignments will also be prime targets for revisiting.

11. Reviewing the TCOs, which are listed below for your convenience, will also be a great preparation for the Final Exam.

1

1.     Given a filter transfer function determined by its frequency domain specification, develop an analog active filter with the selected circuit topology.

Suggested Enabling Objectives

A.    Describe the circuit topologies of noninverting configurations, such as the Sallen-Key filter, and the inverting configuration, such as the multiple feedback filter.

B.    Illustrate that matching the circuit transfer function G(s) to the filter transfer function H(s) results in a set of design equations for filter circuit realization.

C.    Design an appropriate active filter circuit using the operational amplifiers, and determine the values for RC circuit elements; illustrate frequency and impedance scaling.

D.    (Laboratory) Construct a designed filter circuit, experimentally measure its magnitude frequency response, and compare the response with the theoretical calculations to show reasonable agreement. A software tool, such as MultiSim, can be used for circuit simulation.

2

2.     Given the specification for a sampled system, determine the appropriate filter required for accurate analog to digital and digital to analog signal conversion.

 

Suggested Enabling Objectives

A.    Sketch the Fourier transform of an ideal-impulse sampling process to graphically illustrate the sampled signal spectrum is the sum of the scaled original spectrum and its replicas centered at the multiples of the sampling frequency.

B.    Calculate and observe the effects of quantization on a sampled, analog signal as affected by the number of bits used in the sampling.

C.    Use software, such as Matlab, to determine the order of an antialiasing, low-pass filter to satisfy the Nyquist requirement for reducing aliasing noise level.

D.    Use software, such as Matlab, to determine the order of the anti-image filter (reconstruction filter or smooth filter) to satisfy the requirement for reducing the image distortion level to reconstruct the analog signal when supplied with the DAC output of sample and hold voltage levels and the sampling rate. (Laboratory) Design and build a second-order, antialiasing active filter and a second-order, reconstruction filter. Using these filters with a signal generator and the Tower microcontroller board plus an ADC to DAC converter board operating at a particular sampling frequency, demonstrate that your system correctly samples and reconstructs sinusoidal signals of different frequencies and that the Nyquist sampling requirements are met.

3

3.  Investigate difference equations, convolution and digital filtering using moving average filters as an introduction to finite impulse response filters.

 

Suggested Enabling Objectives:

A.    Investigate linear, time-invariant, causal systems.

B.    Examine the structure and characteristics of nonrecursive and recursive difference equations.

C.    Examine impulse and step response characteristics of digital filters.

D.    Investigate the basics of convolution as applied to difference equations.

E.    Mathematically investigate and document the characteristics of various length moving average filters and their response.

F.     (Laboratory) For a given, nonHarvard architecture embedded system, such as the Tower, use the instruction execution rate of the processor in order to determine the frequency response of a real-time moving average filter length when using nonoptimized (i.e., not using DSP hardware running run-time C library functions) on the target (nonDSP) micro board.

4

4.  Introduce finite impulse response (FIR) filter design, analysis and performance using different windowing functions to design and implement low pass, windowed impulse response designed filters, testing and analyzing the real-time performance on a target embedded system board.

 

           Suggested Enabling Objectives:

 

A.    Examine the basic characteristics of finite impulse response filters, including frequency response and linear phase response.

B.    Using the impulse response, examine the characteristics of the approximation of an ideal low-pass filter, including the effects of artificially truncating the impulse response.

C.    Examine the most commonly used window functions, such as rectangular, Hanning, Hamming and Blackman, and examine the frequency domain characteristics of each.

D.    Using the windowed and truncated, impulse response design methodology, design, implement, and test using an embedded system, such as the Tower, a low-pass, finite impulse response digital filter, investigating the performance tradeoffs of filter performance versus coefficient length, and frequency transition width.

5

5.     Introduction to band pass, high pass and band stop FIR filter design, analysis and performance using MATLAB and windowed, impulse response methodology to design, test and analyze the real-time performance on a target embedded system board.

 

Suggested Enabling Objectives:

 

A.    Using the windowed and truncated impulse response design methodology, design, implement, and test using an embedded system, such as the Tower, a band pass, high-pass or band stop finite impulse response digital filter, investigating the performance tradeoffs of filter performance versus coefficient length and frequency transition width.

B.    In the lab, using filter design software, such as Matlab, design, implement, and test a band pass, high-pass, or band stop finite impulse response digital filter using an embedded system, such as the Tower, to investigate the performance tradeoffs of filter performance versus coefficient length and frequency transition width.

C.    Analyze the effects of filter coefficient bit length and quantization on filter response.

6

6.     Introduction to the basic characteristics on a low pass infinite impulse response (IIR) filter and filter design methodologies. 

 

Suggested Enabling Objectives:

     

A.    Examine the basic characteristics of infinite impulse response (IIR) filters.

B.    Review low-pass analog filter characteristics, such as frequency response and cutoff frequency.

C.    Examine and perform the design of a low-pass IIR filter based on bilinear transformation.

D.    Examine and perform the design of a low-pass IIR filter based on a Butterworth filter design using a bilinear transformation.

7

7.     Examine the advanced characteristics, analysis and design methodologies of infinite impulse response (IIR) filter.

 

Suggested Enabling Objectives:

     

A.    Introduce the Chebyshev Type I filter.

B.    Introduce the concept of best fit IIR filter design and the use of filter design software, such as Matlab, in the design of complex IIR filters.

C.    Examine and perform the design of a band pass, high-pass, or band stop IIR filter.

D.    Examine and analyze the performance tradeoffs of IIR filters as compared to FIR filters, including phase response, coefficient quantization effects, real-time performance, and stability.

 

 

8

8.     Given prescribed technical documentation guidelines, create well-documented programs, written reports and oral presentations.

 

Suggested Enabling Objectives:

     

A.    Demonstrate proficiency to assess and interpret technical data in a written manner, such as a lab report.

B.    Demonstrate proficiency to communicate technical data gathered from a lab experiment using verbal skills, such as an oral presentation.

C.    Employ library research to strengthen written or oral presentations.

 

 

 

Finally, if you have any questions for me, please post them to our Q & A Forum or e-mail me. Good luck on the exam!

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